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Robin D. Stone is a New York City based psychotherapist, coach and consultant who works to help you achieve your most optimal self. 

Welcoming Spring with Seasonal Recipes

 

Hey Spring!

Come on in – we’re glad to see you!

It’s been awhile, we know, and with winter hanging around well past her welcome, you’ve had to elbow your way onto the stage. Keep pushing – she’ll drag herself out of here soon enough.

We’ve missed you and your promise of everything new and green, of the earth giving way as stalks and stems yawn and stretch their way to the sky.

We are also unearthing ourselves from layers upon layers of sweaters, coats, scarves, socks and hats. It’s good to feel the warmth of the sun upon our faces.
 

And since we’re trying to eat what’s local and in season, it’s also good to see seasonal veggies other than potatoes, squash and beets. We know that seasonal eating is about harvesting what’s grown nearby instead of what’s trucked (or shipped) in from around the globe, so it allows us to support local agriculture. We know that foods grown locally tend to be more affordable. And we know that we’re giving our body a rich and diverse diet because the food we eat changes through the year.


We know that seasonal eating puts us in sync with the earth’s natural rhythms and calendar. Before progress brought us superstores and any food at any time, we ate according to what was local and fresh (or we canned and froze foods when they were fresh). Many ancient healing traditions are grounded in seasonal eating to build health and strengthen emotional balance. 

So, Dear Spring, for the best in flavor and nutrition, we will look for foods in season right now, like arugula and asparagus and strawberries and cherries. We’ll focus on tender, leafy vegetables that represent all that’s vibrant and young. We will celebrate your arrival with asparagus and spinach dishes, and since winter still can’t take the hint, with a big warm hug. 

Tips: Store rinsed asparagus in a plastic bag in your fridge with the bottom wrapped in damp paper towel. Store spinach unwashed, also in a plastic bag.